Human Capital Development, Six Steps to Get You Started

Human Capital Development, Six Steps to Get You Started

If you are leading in any capacity, you would agree that developing your people is of vital importance. So, what is your plan? What strategy is in place to help your team move from where they are to where they need to be? Leadership development does not happen by accident it happens on purpose.

Most would agree that the type of people you want on your team will be looking for growth environments. If you are able to provide an environment where one can develop, you will start attracting the best and brightest.

You do not need to consult with McKinsey & Company to develop a state of the art training center. You may need to change your mindset from what you don’t have, to what you do have.  You can develop your team by spending time with your team. As you spend time investing into your people growth will follow. How do you start? What do you do? Pick one person, identify a mutual opportunity and follow these six steps.

Here are six steps to get you started.

  1. Tell them
  2. Show them
  3. Let them try
  4. Praise what they do well
  5. Redirect where they don’t
  6. Follow up, keep reinforcing 

It has been said that people don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. As you invest your time into developing others you are making a statement that you care. Remember your team is not is interested in what you say, they are interested in what you do.

Leadership development is intentional. So be intentional, start with one person and place it on your calendar. Write the words, “Leadership Development” @ 2:00 with Sam. Feels good don’t it! Remember, what we value, we do. So, DO Leadership development!

Charlie Moulton

How do You Know When it’s Time to Give Someone a Leadership Role?

How do You Know When it’s Time to Give Someone a Leadership Role?

This is such a loaded question, and one could write a treatise on the subject. However, for the sake of simplicity, allow me to create a scenario to better drive home my point and support you in the question of “How do you know when it’s time to give someone a leadership role?”

Let’s assume this is a candidate that is already active in the organization. Let’s begin this process of finding out if someone is ready for a leadership role by asking yourself a handful of questions to see if you and the organization are ready to support the candidate.  

Questions to Ask Yourself

  • What is the role written down in the form of a job description?
  • Is that job description clear?
  • Does this new job allow the potential new person an opportunity to be less than perfect?
  • Are you confident in the ability of the person who will be coming on board?
  • Will there be follow up training?
  • What is the target and how will the new person know if they are hitting, or not hitting, the target?

Since we have already identified that person is already in the organization, having a conversation (or two) with the current direct report is a must. Ask questions such as:

Questions to Ask the Direct Report

  • On a scale of 1-10, how would you rank this person’s work ethic?
  • Does the person finish projects on time?
  • How often do personal issues come up?
  • On a scale of 1-10, how does this person handle conflict? (ask for specifics)
  • On a scale of 1-10, is this person a team player?
  • What project did the person work on that most excited him/her?
  • What project did this person work on that caused frustration?
  • Which best describes this person, humble or arrogant?
  • Is this person hungry?
  • Is this person smart?
  • Have you ever seen this person act in humility? (ask for specifics)
  • Have you ever seen this person act arrogantly? (ask for specifics)
  • What do I need to know about this person?
  • Would you hire this person again?

Asking questions takes time, if you ask these questions it will take you about 30 minutes, however, request one hour to go through all the questions as you do not want to rush. 

Be all in, be present 

Be engaged when asking the questions and be ready to listen intently to what is being said. Pay attention to the body language and the tone of one’s voice as you wait for a response to your questions. You must be engaged in the conversation, so consider removing all distractions, including all electronic devices. 

These questions will better prepare you to meet with the potential candidate and allow your conversation with the candidate to be fluid. You will also be able to take a deeper dive on some of the questions you need clarification on, so take good notes.

So how do you know when it’s time to give someone a leadership role?

Here are 10 characteristics that I look for before promoting a candidate: 

  1. They are punctual. Show up on time.
  2. Faithful with what they already have. 
  3. They are able to submit to authority
  4. Gracious, not combative
  5. Self-starter
  6. People are already following them
  7. Good listener
  8. Takes responsibility for actions
  9. Cool under pressure
  10. They ask questions, not make statements 

Summing it up

This list is not exhaustive, there are other things that are important to me, however, it’s a list. It’s on paper. I know what I am looking for. Do you? Write it down. Create your own list of the characteristics you are looking for.

Be patient as you dialogue with the candidate’s direct report. Get clarity on questions that need more insight. Ask around. Who else in the organization can better help you to get a pulse on whether this person is the right fit? The candidate need not be perfect. Perhaps you are the person God will use to develop this person. That’s the beautiful thing about leadership, we get the privilege of coming alongside people and helping them to develop and become leaders. 

Pulling for you!

Charlie Moulton

When the Sunday Morning Service Turns into a Train Wreck

When the Sunday Morning Service Turns into a Train Wreck

It was a Sunday morning service like no other. Everything that could go wrong went wrong. Don’t think for a moment that I am exaggerating. For example, the audio team could not get the squeaking and feedback corrected.

The worship team took a new song out of the oven before it was fully cooked. The congregation was as lost as a ball in the tall Alabama weeds trying to learn the song.

The guy doing the announcements was having a bad day and appeared to have the love and compassion of Osama Bin Laden.

I also contributed, getting lost in my sermon notes 3 different times and going on to preach my longest sermon of the year. Not my best to say the least.

At lunch, I remember looking at my wife and saying the following words: “That was the worst service we ever had, what a train wreck.”

So how do you rebound from a service that really is a train wreck?

Here are 10 things to do:

  1. Learn from it.
  2. Talk about it. Laugh! The fact that anyone comes back the following week is proof of God’s sovereignty.
  3. Get clear on what you want.
  4. Get clear on what you don’t want.
  5. Be sure everyone on the team has the right tools to do the job. Ask, make sure!
  6. Remember God can change lives, even in so-called ‘train wrecks’.
  7. When in doubt, don’t tell them, show them. Model to your team what ‘good’ looks like.
  8. Re-evaluate if all team members are in the right spot. If not, make changes.
  9. Encourage your team.
  10. Ensure your team gets back on track immediately!

Is that Great Volunteer/Employee Ready to Lead? Part 2

Is that Great Volunteer/Employee Ready to Lead? Part 2

My intent for Part 1 of this blog post was to point out that it does not take much for a volunteer/employee to differentiate themselves from their peers. I suggested that simply showing up for work on time and having a positive attitude may be enough for a volunteer/employee to stand head and shoulders above the crowd. Of course, when this same person begins completing tasks and adding value, we may be inclined to herald from the rooftops, “I think we have a leader amongst us!”

But before we get ahead of ourselves and pronounce that the next Abraham Lincoln is in our midst, let’s slow down a bit and consider doing what I call the self-test. The self-test is a series of small tasks that have deadlines attached to them. For example, I recently identified ten men whom I thought had the potential to lead others.  Each possessed a great attitude and were getting things done within the organization I lead. Clearly they were standing out like that purple cow!

I had my assistant send out an email inviting the ten to join me for what I call Leadership Basics. The date I offered was Thursdays and I even provided two time slots, 5:30AM or 4:30PM. The training would last just three weeks with each of those sessions being 1.5 hours in length.

Here is what I was looking for:

  • Would they show up on time and prepared?
  • How would they enter the meeting? With a great attitude or talking about a bad morning or bad day?
  • How did they engage with others?
  • Were they a listener or a talker?
  • Were they gracious, or like a bull in a china shop?
  • Were they self-motivated (no reward offered for completing the assignment) or were they motivated by gifts (I offered a free dinner and a movie for one assignment)?

Here is what I found

  • Some were late, some were on time.
  • Some did their assignments, some got busy and even shared with me how busy they are (even though the assignments all took less than 10 minutes).
  • Some were prepared, some were not.
  • Some let us know about their personal problems and some did not.
  • Some let me know that they needed to leave early (and even took 10 minutes from the groups’ time to let us know why)!

The Good News

The good news is that two of these men stood out! They were able to demonstrate to me that with coaching, they have the potential to be future all-stars.  As leaders, it is our job to identify the talent within our organization and also to develop talent. Before we entrust more responsibilities to our people, let’s make sure that they can handle it. Remember, if they can’t manage themselves, they will not be able to manage others.

It does not take long to find out if one can manage themselves. Consider a self-test or two for that volunteer/employee that you are considering dispensing more responsibility to. What you find out may surprise you!

Is that Great Volunteer/Employee Ready to Lead?

Is that Great Volunteer/Employee Ready to Lead?

One of the goals of team leaders is to identify the up and coming talent that is already within the walls of the organization. For most of us, they stand out like a purple cow. What is it that makes them so easy to spot?

 Here are four characteristics that stand out:

  1. Positive attitude
  2. Show up/available
  3. Open to learning new things
  4. They get the job done

These are all good things. However, how many times have we had that so called “perfect fit” become a not-so-perfect fit? Perhaps more than we would like to admit! Naturally, we as leaders are drawn to those with great attitudes and those who roll up their sleeves to get the job done.

What is really happening is we are noticing those around us who have differentiated themselves from their peers. This is a good thing! As I was climbing the leadership ladder during my time in corporate America, I had an Executive sit me down. He told me, “Charlie, I have good news and bad news for you today. The bad news is, you have lots of competition. The good news is, they’re not that good!”

He went on to say, “It will NOT be very difficult for you to stand out or to distance yourself from your competition or even those paid by this very firm.” He continued, “If you simply show up for work on time, you will separate yourself from most.” He shared some very practical things that were not taught to me during business school. He said, “Shine your shoes and have a great attitude.”

Of course, these are all practical things as they hardly speak to one’s capacity or lead us to believe one can lead a team. So what’s the point? It does not take much to stand out. Yes, we are to encourage this type of behavior. We certainly want those that serve with us to know we care about them and we want them to know they are appreciated. But the real question is, can this person actually lead? In my next blog, we will look to find if one can lead by performing what I call a simple self-test. Until then…

Lead well and by example!